Emotional fugitive dectector - 3016

 
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How far your face can take you as a game controller?

Emotional Fugitive Detector - 3016 is a game that uses human face as its controller.  

In this game, two players sit on opposite sides of a table and try to convey information using facial expressions, without the computer’s face tracking software recognizing them. Players need to find a way to express emotion: expressive enough for a human, too subtle for a computer. After each game, players receive a receipt recording the result of the game -- either a certification for a "Model Citizen", or an execution note for an "Emotional Fugitive".

This project’s main challenge was working around inaccurate facetracking technology -- it was not sensitive enough for consistent control.  Matt Parker, a professor at the NYU Game Center, suggested that instead of trying to fix a technical issue, design around it may be a better solution. We took his advice -- Instead of trying to improve the technology, we decided to make the game about technology not being good enough.

When showcasing at the GDC2017, we added a curtain to maintain a proper lighting for the face tracking software as well as to isolate the player from the exhibition. Also after each game, player will receive a receipt based on the result of the game -- either a certification for a "Model Citizen", or an execution note for an "emotional fugitive".

See a video of the Alt.Ctrl.GDC 2017 made by Polygon, Emotional Fugitive Detector 3016 starts at 4:17 :

 

 

 

Installation Design and Fabricating :

In this project, I designed and fabricated the EFD-3016's installation:

1st Generation : Amazon shipping box with tapes.

1st Generation : Amazon shipping box with tapes.

2nd Generation : Foam boards covered by printed paper. Twelve pieces connected with socket chisels.

2nd Generation : Foam boards covered by printed paper. Twelve pieces connected with socket chisels.

3rd Generation : Acrylic boards and foam boards for main structure; screws and nuts for connection; matte vinyls for decoration and narrative.

3rd Generation : Acrylic boards and foam boards for main structure; screws and nuts for connection; matte vinyls for decoration and narrative.

This game was inspired by the Alt.Ctrl.GDC 2016 exhibition. After going, our goal was to showcase next year at Alt.Ctrl.GDC 2017.

One constraint that came with this goal was that the installation piece needed to be sturdy enough to stand a week-long show with people interacting with it but also be small enough for transportation. To fulfill this requirement, I designed the blueprint below. On the left, the exterior design with face hole and grate. On the right is the interior design, showing a way to hide the key board from the player.

 

Visual Design:

For the a esthetics, I decided to use gray and black as the main tones for a dystopian setting.

As exemplified in the posters below, I chose these colors because in the narrative the Human Management Bureau believes emotions should be banned. As a result, they would not choose expressive colors. I used this color palette when creating the dystopic propaganda posters featured below. The copy was written to match the style and evoke an emotionless future. For the same reason the robot itself, as well as most of the game, uses the same color palette.

 

Narrative Design:

Inspired by Papers, Please and official documents in real life. I intended to create a black-humor-politic narrative.

Some quotes:

" The Human Management Bureau is performing random Emotion Inspections today. All citizens must comply.

You will be required to:

* Insert your face into the Evaluation Aperture.

* Hold until the inspection procedure is complete.

Humans found in possession of 3 or more emotions during this inspection shall be deemed EMOTIC, and will be punished with death. "

 

" Emotionless, better society. "